Rhodora Annexation Approved

Lake Stevens, WA.  On Tuesday night the City Council unanimously approved Ordinance 1041 to annex approximately 100 acres into the city – an action our firm initiated and supported on behalf of landowners in the annexation area.

One of the direct mailers.
One of the door hangers used.

About Our Role
Our firm was retained by our client in September of 2017 to complete an analysis recommending if an annexation could be successful and by what method.  After studying parcel data (acreage, valuation) and voter registration data in the area, we concluded that the best approach was the Direct Petition Method.  Further, we used our research to identify an annexation area meeting the location and boundary criteria in state law.

We were subsequently retained to secure signatures for the required 10% and 60% petitions (based on % of valuation in the annexation area).  To complete this task, we developed a communications strategy to provide answers to the most common questions about annexation.  We utilized a combination of direct mail, door hangers and door belling (see examples to the left).

We successfully gathered the 10% and 60% petitions, negotiated applicable zoning and indebtedness, completed the required State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) checklist, and prepared exhibits and narratives to be included in the official “Notice of Intent” to annex filed with the Washington State Boundary Review Board for Snohomish County (BRB).

The annexation was challenged by a group of residents.  However, the annexation was unanimously approved by the BRB and an appeal of the BRB’s decision was dismissed by Snohomish County Superior Court.

For more information on the annexation, see visit our project page.

Got a project you think we can help with?  Contact us!

The problem with being a “Great Place to Live, Work & Play”

Traveling around as much as I do, I hear it from Mayors, I see it in community vision and mission statements, and I read it in marketing brochures. . .

[insert city name here] – “A Great Place to Live, Work and Play/Shop/Stay”

It’s been the tagline, catch phrase, sound bite, etc. for years now.  And candidates for governor and congress use it in speeches (even last night), chambers use it, downtown groups use it, economic developers use it, etc.  And this is a big problem.  So, if you’re marketing yourself as a great place to live, work and play, your community has no chance to stand out.  NO CHANCE!

Here’s why:

  1. What does this statement really tell me about your community?  Nada.  It doesn’t tell me who you are, what you have, or what’s unique.  So looking at “Anywhere: An awesome place to live, work and play” and “Lake Town: Live a Lake Life” which one do you want to know more about?  You’re community needs to be united around an identify that is unique and authentic to you.
  2. At best you’re running with the pack when using this as the fulcrum of your marketing.  I can type “great place to live work and play” into Google and get 4.35 trillion hits.  Sort through the first few pages and you’ll see community after community saying the exact same thing, along with a couple articles like this and some articles about live, work play (LWP) mixed use type projects.
  3. And the pack you’re running in is big.  It’s the more than 35,000 places in the United States that have a permanent population and buildings (Source: USGS), especially the 19,500 cities, towns and incorporated places (statista.com).

So if you’re using (or thinking about using) “Great Place to Live, Work and Play” to describe your community, STOP!  Because even declining rural communities can stake the same claim, because their declining population is less about them and more on the fact that there are better places out there to live, work and play. . . ones that have a better marketing message or that are willing to invest in the amenities and infrastructure that proves it.

Still think it doesn’t apply to every community?  Then envision the supermarket.  You may not want to buy a can of sardines, but there are cans of it on the shelf because that is what some wants to buy them.

 

Rhodora Annexation Hits 60% Milestone

On July 19th, the Lake Stevens City Council approved Resolution 2018-018, accepting the 60% petition for a 103-acre annexation known as the Rhodora Annexation.  The approval sends the annexation forward to the State Boundary Review Board for a mandatory 45 day review.  If during the 45 day review period no jurisdictions request the board invoke their jurisdiction, the annexation will return to the City for final consideration.

Toyer Strategic has been assisting the petitioners through the entire annexation process, which began last September.  For more information on the Rhodora Annexation.

 

Toyer Discusses Trestle’s Economic Challenges

The U.S. Highway 2 corridor between Everett, Washington and Lake Stevens, Washington is a big transportation issue that impacts the lives of many residents and businesses.  The Lake Stevens community has started a #LetsFixTheTrestle movement to help highlight the need for investment in this critical infrastructure.

In a recent interview, David Toyer, owner of Toyer Strategic, discusses the economic challenges the Trestle creates in Lake Stevens.

Toyer Supports #LetsFixTheTrestle

David Toyer, owner of Toyer Strategic, recently appeared in two videos that support a fix to the Trestle.  The first video “Living with the Trestle” highlights the challenges and safety concerns faced by the residents and businesses of Lake Stevens who rely on the east-west U.S. 2 Trestle as the area’s main transportation corridor.  The second video features an extended interview with Toyer on the Trestle’s impact to Lake Stevens’ economic development.