First Ever #EconDev Survey of Micropolitans

Our company believes that micropolitans have tremendous growth opportunities ahead, which is why we’ve focused our economic development services on their needs.

And that why we’re also doing the first ever economic development (#econdev) survey just for the nation’s 551 micropolitans (list of micropolitans).

The benefit to participating micropolitans is two-fold:

  1. You’ll get a report with aggregate survey results, which can help you better benchmark your community against your peers in future strategic planning.
  2. You have the ability to submit available buildings and sites to us through the survey.  That information will be kept on file and when we’re working with our private sector clients your micropolitan will get considered if it meets the project parameters.

Approved: Hawks Prairie Logistics Park

Last night the Lacey City Council approved the master site plan and wetland development permits for Hawks Prairie Logistics Park, a 130-acre industrial development that will feature three buildings totaling 1.9 million square feet of industrial space.  The main building on the site will house a new Home Depot distribution center.

Our firm played an instrumental role in the project’s approval, providing the project’s economic impact analysis and performing required land use analysis to address the policies and conditions that limit the granting of wetland development permits.

Additionally, we provided early project management services to support the project’s pre-application site plan review,  the processing of the land use applications, and the facilitation of a meeting with the adjacent residential neighborhoods.

You Should Know the Economic Impact

How often have you. . .

  • Heard a company press on a city or county to make a decision based on their economic impact locally, but without any data?
  • Considered incentives for an economic development deal without knowing more than the number of jobs and total investment as given by the company?
  • Lacked specific information on the projects your economic development group helped support?
  • Had a developer tout the economic benefits of their proposed speculative building, but not have data to back it up?

In every case, it is important to have this data:

  • To help prioritize how to invest your resources
  • To ensure incentives are based on a ROI to your community
  • To prove the effectiveness of your EDO

Our firm helps our clients (cities, EDOs, companies) with the analysis of the economic impact.  Relying on RIMS II multiplier data from the BEA, we can help you analyze and determine the direct, indirect and induced impacts of a project (or projects) on jobs, economic output and wages.

Contact us and let us help you determine the impacts of your next project.

 

If You Don’t Have a Certified Site, You Need This

Site certification has gained importance over the last several years as states, utilities and railroads create certification programs.

But what if you can’t afford to “certify” your site?

Simple, you can do your own due diligence as if you were the project.  Why?  Because site certification was really born out of economic developers not being prepared and knowing their available sites as integrally as they should.

Below is a simple template we use in the early stages of competing due diligence for our private sector clients.  And, if you have this information on hand, I’m confident that you’ll save yourself a lot of time the next time your asked to respond to a site selectors RFP.

Preliminary Industrial Site Assessment verson 1.3

Toyer Supports Proposed Logistic Park

This week, Toyer Strategic successfully held a community meeting with property owners adjacent to a proposed logistics park in Lacey, Washington.

Toyer is one of the project consultants supporting the entitlement of the Hawks Prairie Logistics Park – a project that would create around 1.9 million square feet of warehousing and distribution space on 131 acres.

An economic impact analysis produced by our firm estimates that the project could result in nearly 900 direct, indirect and induced jobs at full-build out of all phases of the project.

Lacey, Washington has a population just over 49,000 and sits on the Interstate 5 (I-5) corridor south of Tacoma, Washington and immediately north of Olympia (the state capitol).