Toyer Supports Proposed Logistic Park

This week, Toyer Strategic successfully held a community meeting with property owners adjacent to a proposed logistics park in Lacey, Washington.

Toyer is one of the project consultants supporting the entitlement of the Hawks Prairie Logistics Park – a project that would create around 1.9 million square feet of warehousing and distribution space on 131 acres.

An economic impact analysis produced by our firm estimates that the project could result in nearly 900 direct, indirect and induced jobs at full-build out of all phases of the project.

Lacey, Washington has a population just over 49,000 and sits on the Interstate 5 (I-5) corridor south of Tacoma, Washington and immediately north of Olympia (the state capitol).

 

We Help Companies with Marketing

Creekside Consulting (Mark Mitchell), a provider of interim CFO and COO services in the Pacific Northwest, recently contracted with Toyer Strategic to produce a series of three direct mail marketing pieces for distribution to existing and prospective clients.  Here’s what Mark had to say:

“I’ve been following what Toyer Strategic does for direct mail marketing and wanted to mix up what I’ve been doing for Creekside Consulting. After a couple of conversations with David about my business, he and his team developed and presented several designs. I liked their ideas have ordered a series of three marketing pieces that will be distributed to clients and prospective clients. I was impressed with the process, quality of work and quick turnaround. I plan to continue working with the Toyer Strategic marketing team.”

Check out more client testimonials

Project Update: City of Pacific WA

Toyer Strategic Consulting has completed the Phase I of a two phase business retention and expansion project for the City of Pacific and Port of Seattle.  The Phase I inventory discusses our methods for data collection, and categories and analyzes the types of existing businesses within Pacific’s corporate limits.  Phase II of the project (now underway) involves distribution of a general business survey and completion of business retention and expansion (BRE) visits.

Check out the Phase I report:

Phase I Business Inventory for City of Pacific

Plan for Success in 2019

Soon summer will be over and you’ll start planning your annual executive, council or organization retreat.  You’ll analyze your business, organization or community and carefully put together a budget and a plan for 2019.

But, is planning the same way you did last year going to yield better results?

Yes, if you avoid these common mistakes:

  1. Too Much Optimism. No one wants to be negative. And unless self appointed to the role of ‘contrarian’ no employee, board member or council person wants that title. But, if you go through a planning process where none of your conversations dive into uncomfortable territory or produced thoughtful disagreement, then you’ve got problems. Inevitably there are some sacred cows holding you back. To be truly successful, both the good and the bad have to be on the table and everyone has to be empowered and prepared to state the obvious. No pain, no gain.
  2. Cruise Control.  Like comfy pants that make you feel good or cruise control in your car, goal setting can default to what’s easy, reliable or comfortable.  But, comfortable doesn’t get you better, bigger or bolder. This year it’s time to stretch.  Set goals that you may not accomplish, but still make you look good for trying.
  3. Rephrase, Rearrange, Repeat. Your 2019 plan shouldn’t be an extension of your 2018 plan, which was an extension of your 2017 plan? When you’re planning, you should be able to look back at the plans from the last several years and see that your not stuck in the same spot.  This can help the discussion as you can often see that while you may have fallen short of a goal last year, you’ve still grown.
  4. Your Budget is Not Your Plan. Do you need a plan? Yes. Do you need a budget? Absolutely. Is a budget a plan? Not even close.  Budgets are based on a conservative picture of what could happen.  And budgets can be inflexible.  By contrast, plans shouldn’t be as conservative and they should be adaptable to changing conditions.  Tracking a line item budget month to month doesn’t measure progress, it measures restraint.

Want to accelerate your growth next year?  Contact us to facilitate your next company, organization or community retreat.

Pacific Retains Toyer for Economic Development Project

The City of Pacific, Washington has retained Toyer Strategic Consulting (TSC) to complete an economic development project funded by the City and a grant from the Port of Seattle.

Under the project scope TSC will identify, categorize and visit key employers within the community.  A final consultant report and business retention and expansion (BRE) program recommendations are due to the City and Port no later than November 1st of this year.

“We are excited to work with the City of Pacific and support their existing businesses,” said David Toyer, owner of Toyer Strategic.  “Pacific is an especially unique location in Washington State, supporting jointly with the City of Sumner one of nine ‘manufacturing industrial centers’ that could yield up to 2,100 acres of new industrial development along the SR 167 corridor.”

About Pacific
Located 28 miles south of downtown Seattle, Pacific is split between King and Pierce counties and has a 2017 population estimate of 7,184.

The cities of Pacific and Sumner were provisionally designated a manufacturing industrial center (MIC) in 2016 by the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) pending completion of a MIC subarea plan expected later this year.